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UK Position Statement on the use of Organs from Hepatitis C Viraemic Donors and Increased Infectious Risk Donors in Hepatitis C Negative Recipients

BTS_BritishViralHepatitisGroup

The British Viral Hepatitis Group has recently issued a position statement on the use of organs from hepatitis C viraemic donors in hepatitis C negative recipients. View the PDF on the BASL website using the link below.

 

British Transplantation Society Statement on Consultation to review policy on Organ Donation

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“ The last decade has seen significant improvements in the organisation of organ donation and in public awareness of the issues around organ donation and transplantation. The British Transplantation Society is very supportive of any review of policy which may lead to an increase in organ donation and transplantation in the United Kingdom and welcomes the outcome of the consultation on organ donation in England.”

BTS Executive Committee

 

An opportunity to make a difference to Renal Services at a National Level

The first ‘Getting it Right First Time’ (GIRFT) report, published by Professor Tim Briggs suggested that changes could be made to improve pathways of care, patient experience, and outcomes – with significant cost savings, and this approach now forms a key part of the roll-out of the recommendations in Lord Carter’s report (February 2016) in operational performance and productivity in acute hospitals.
 
As a result, Renal Services has been added to the programme roll out, and GIRFT is now looking for a skilled and effective clinical leader, who is recognised as expert by their clinical colleagues and with the endorsement of their specialty society to undertake the Renal Clinical Lead.
 
For further information about GIRFT, the role of Clinical Lead, and details of how to apply please visit: www.rnoh.nhs.uk/GIRFT

Closing dates for applications: 5th February 2017

View GIRFT Clinical Leads Vacancy Advertisement.pdf

View GIRFT Editorial Feature.pdf

Call for funding for Community Initiatives

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Living Donor Transplantation for Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) Communities

NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) have commissioned the National Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Transplant Alliance to manage the delivery of a Living donor Transplantation Initiative, up until March 2018. The funding of £90,000 is in response to a recent decline in the number of living donor transplantations among BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic) communities. From 169 living donors from a BAME background in 2013/14 to 136 in 2015/16, there has been a decline of 19.5%.

The coordinated approach of NHSBT commissioned NBTA living transplant initiatives will address the inequality in donation and transplantation for BAME communities, and aim to widen the impact of effective practices that improve and save lives.

There are three key outcomes which NBTA will be required to achieve which are:

  • 40 people from BAME background seeking information or expressing an interest in living donation
  • 25 people from BAME background being assessed for living donation
  • 10 people from BAME background, after assessment, being suitable for living donation

 

There are four priority geographical areas and BAME communities associated with each as follows.

  1. North West London : Hindu and Jain communities
  2. West London: Sikh communities
  3. London ( targeted boroughs): African and African-Caribbean communities
  4. Leicester: Hindu and Sikh communities

 

Although NBTA have four priority areas, NBTA would welcome initiatives from across the UK and funding permitting will be pleased to discuss any proposals.

Following this announcement for seeking submissions, all bids should be made by 5 December 2016, using the pro-forma. The Steering Group will announce decisions on the submissions on15 December 2016 and projects can commence by early 2017. This first round of submissions may be followed by a second round in early 2017, depending on the availability of the funding.

The overall outcome for focussing on BAME living donation work is to close the gap between black and minority ethnic communities and white communities in securing transplantations at the same time as securing savings to the NHS on the costs of healthcare.  To reach these goals and the outcomes NBTA will deliver:

  • Better awareness amongst BAME communities of health inequalities and the need for donation
  • More collaborative working, and sharing of best practice amongst organisations including NHS Blood and Transplant working on donation and transplant to improve health outcomes for BAME communities
  • Incremental change in the numbers of BAME people represented on donation registers and agreeing to transplantation.
  • Collation of resources of effective interventions and materials on donation and transplant issues with BAME communities
  • Behaviour change and increased BAME and Faith Community Engagement.

 

Sally Johnson, Director of Organ Donation and Transplantation at NHS Blood and Transplant said:

“People from Black and Asian communities have a higher incidence of conditions such as diabetes and certain forms of hepatitis, and currently make up a third of the active kidney transplant waiting list.  Although some are able to receive a transplant from a white donor, for many the best match will come from a donor from the same ethnic background. While only 5% of all deceased organ donors currently come from black and Asian backgrounds, living donation can be the life-saving opportunity, a patient waiting for a transplant desperately needs. With increased awareness and improved information, we hope that more potential living donors will come forward and more patients will have their lives saved or transformed.”

 

Orin Lewis OBE, Co-chair of NBTA and Chief Executive of ACLT (African Caribbean Leukaemia Trust) said

“The NBTA applauds NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) for committing its funds and trust in our members to delivering this initiative on behalf of the various UK BAME communities. This NHSBT funded initiative is a major “game changer” for BAME communities in relation to Living donor Transplantation. A successful undertaking of the 3 key outcomes will enable an acceptable positive ripple effect awareness effect from with the aforementioned BAME communities and result in more lives being saved.”

 

For more information on the Living Donor Transplantation Initiative and to request application pack please email Kirit Modi – Steering Group Chair on kiritmodi1@hotmail.com .

The National Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Transplant Alliance (NBTA) is a forum of organisations, set up by the Department of Health, who work together on behalf of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) patients and communities. NBTA’s aims to address the disproportionality in stem cell, blood and organ donation through raising awareness of inequalities, promoting the importance of transplantation; with the aim of increasing the number of BAME donor registrations and consent to transplantation.

For more information on NBTA please visit  http://www.nbta-uk.org.uk/2016/10/invitation-to-make-submissions-for-the-living-transplant-initiative-lti/

and for press interviews please contact either of the following Co-Chairs:

Mr Orin Lewis OBE on 020 3757 7700 or orin@aclt.org

Masters Degree in Transplantation, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom

University of Liverpool has launched a suite of 4 modules related to transplantation sciences for transplant surgeons, nephrologists and urologists.

Experience in these subspecialties is essential. These modules are offered wholly online study using an interactive electronic platform, which produces a high quality interface for learning and teaching through interactive keynote lectures, discussion board and journal clubs. Each module is 30 credits at Masters level.

Successful completion of all 4 modules and dissertation, students can achieve a Masters Degree. English Language Exam is NOT required for those who studied medicine in English.

This is the first of its kind degree in transplantation from a reputable UK university. The course provides up-to-date knowledge covering many angles of adult, pediatric and pancreatic transplantation clinical practice. Registration starts in September 2016. The course commences in Feb 2017. Typical cost is £900 per/module (dissertation fees to be advised later).

Enquiries to be made via Mr Ahmed Halawa, Consultant Transplant Surgeon, UK  at ahmed.halawa@sth.nhs.uk
For more information visit:  https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/medicine/cpd/courses/

Statement on media coverage

Statement on media coverage about organ donation and women carrying babies diagnosed with non-survivable conditions

In response to a number of media articles implying that women carrying babies with a non-survivable condition will be pressurised into proceeding with their pregnancy in order to donate their babies organs, the British Transplantation Society has issued the following statement

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